Monthly Archives: March 2012

Booting an Ubuntu 12.04 virtual machine in an LXC container

One thing that we’ve been working on for LXC in 12.04 is getting rid of any remaining LXC specific hack in our templates. This means that you can now run a perfectly clean Ubuntu system in a container without any change.

To better illustrate that, here’s a guide on how to boot a standard Ubuntu VM in a container.

First, you’ll need an Ubuntu VM image in raw disk format. The next few steps also assume a default partitioning where the first primary partition is the root device. Make sure you have the lxc package installed and up to date and lxcbr0 enabled (the default with recent LXC).

Then run kpartx -a vm.img this will create loop devices in /dev/mapper for your VM partitions, in the following configuration I’m assuming /dev/mapper/loop0p1 is the root partition.

Now write a new LXC configuration file (myvm.conf in my case) containing: = veth = up = lxcbr0
lxc.utsname = myvminlxc

lxc.tty = 4
lxc.pts = 1024
lxc.rootfs = /dev/mapper/loop0p1
lxc.arch = amd64
lxc.cap.drop = sys_module mac_admin

lxc.cgroup.devices.deny = a
# Allow any mknod (but not using the node)
lxc.cgroup.devices.allow = c *:* m
lxc.cgroup.devices.allow = b *:* m
# /dev/null and zero
lxc.cgroup.devices.allow = c 1:3 rwm
lxc.cgroup.devices.allow = c 1:5 rwm
# consoles
lxc.cgroup.devices.allow = c 5:1 rwm
lxc.cgroup.devices.allow = c 5:0 rwm
#lxc.cgroup.devices.allow = c 4:0 rwm
#lxc.cgroup.devices.allow = c 4:1 rwm
# /dev/{,u}random
lxc.cgroup.devices.allow = c 1:9 rwm
lxc.cgroup.devices.allow = c 1:8 rwm
lxc.cgroup.devices.allow = c 136:* rwm
lxc.cgroup.devices.allow = c 5:2 rwm
# rtc
lxc.cgroup.devices.allow = c 254:0 rwm
lxc.cgroup.devices.allow = c 10:229 rwm
lxc.cgroup.devices.allow = c 10:200 rwm
lxc.cgroup.devices.allow = c 1:7 rwm
lxc.cgroup.devices.allow = c 10:228 rwm
lxc.cgroup.devices.allow = c 10:232 rwm

The bits in bold may need updating if you’re not using the same architecture, partition scheme or bridges as I’m.

Then finally, run: lxc-start -n myvminlxc -f myvm.conf

And watch your VM boot in an LXC container.

I did this test with a desktop VM using network manager so it didn’t mind LXC’s random MAC address, server VMs might get stuck for a minute at boot time because of that though.
In such case, either clean /etc/udev/rules.d/70-persistent-net.rules or set “” to the same mac address as your VM.

Once done, run kpartx -d vm.img to remove the loop devices.

Posted in Canonical voices, LXC, Planet Ubuntu | Tagged | 28 Comments